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strmwtr_illus_homeKeeping our Waterways Safe and Clean

Welcome to our Stormwater Program Web site. Here you will find the latest news on efforts to reduce stormwater pollution, informative educational materials, pollution prevention tips for residents and businesses, online documents and reporting forms, links to other stormwater program participants and more. Together, we can prevent stormwater pollution and keep our channels, creeks, bays and ocean clean.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Learn what stormwater pollution is, how it happens and how it affects you, including government regulations and requirements. You can also view the latest NPDES permits, DAMP and County stormwater program reports.

FOG (Fats, Oils and Grease) PROGRAM

What Cypress Citizens Can Do to Keep Cypress' Sewers Fat-Free

POLLUTION PREVENTION FOR RESIDENTS

Prevention tips and guidelines for residents.

POLLUTION PREVENTION FOR BUSINESSES

Prevention tips and guidelines for businesses.

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE AND OIL RECYCLING

Collection sites where you can take old paint, pesticides, batteries, solvents and other items to be recycled, and certified oil recycling collection centers where you can recycle used motor oil.

POLLUTION REPORTING

How to report stormwater pollution or street drain problems.

KIDS' CORNER

Kid power can help prevent stormwater pollution. Check it out.

LINKS

Links to related sites.

VIDEOS:

BROCHURES:

POSTERS


strmwtr_illus_general General Information

THE PROBLEM: WHAT IS STORMWATER POLLUTION?

Stormwater pollution is urban runoff water that has picked up pollutants as it flows through the storm drain system-a network of channels, gutters and pipes that collect runoff from city streets, neighborhoods, farms, construction sites and parking lots-and empties directly into local waterways.

Unlike sewage, which goes to treatment plants, urban runoff flows untreated through the storm drain system. Anything thrown, swept or poured into the street, gutter or a catch basin-the curbside openings that lead into the storm drain system-can flow directly into our channels, creeks, bays and ocean. This includes pollutants like trash, pet waste, cigarette butts, motor oil, anti-freeze, runoff from pesticides and fertilizers, paint from brushes and containers rinsed in the gutter and toxic household chemicals.

For more information:
The Ocean Begins at Your Front Door

The Answer: Preventing Stormwater Pollution

Everyone in Orange County can help prevent stormwater pollution. It is often caused by everyday behavior that you may not realize contributes to the problem. Simple behavior changes are all it takes to prevent stormwater pollution, if we all do our part. Find out how.

REGULATORY INFORMATION

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of any pollutant to navigable waters from a point source unless the discharge is authorized by a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit.

The 1987 passage of the Water Quality Act established NPDES permit requirements for discharges of stormwater. The NPDES permit program controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States.

Industrial facilities and construction sites are regulated by the State Water Resources Control Board, through general stormwater permits. Cities and counties are regulated through permits issued by the Regional Water Quality Control Boards. Since 1990, operators of large storm drain systems such as Orange County's have been required to:

  • Develop a stormwater management program designed to prevent harmful pollutants from being dumped or washed by stormwater runoff,into the stormwater system, then discharged into local waterbodies; and
  • Obtain a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit.

DOCUMENTS AND REPORTS

Municipal National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits

The permits of each region outline additional steps for a storm water management program and specify requirements to help protect the beneficial uses of the receiving waters. They require permittees to develop and implement Best Management Practices (BMPs) to control/reduce the discharge of pollutants to waters of the United States to the maximum extent practicable (MEP).

Orange County Third and Fourth Term NPDES Municipal Stormwater Permits

Drainage Area Management Plan

The Drainage Area Management Plan (DAMP) describes the Orange County Stormwater Program, implemented by the County of Orange and cities to comply with their jointly held stormwater permit. It is the principal policy and guidance document for the countywide NPDES Stormwater Program.

http://ocwatersheds.com/programs/waterways/stormwater/reportsdocuments


strmwtr_illus_residents Pollution Prevention for Residents

Anything we use in our home or cars, like paint, pesticide, fertilizers, cleaners and motor oil can wind up in the street and contribute to stormwater pollution. Fortunately, it doesn't take much to prevent pollution.

For more information on stormwater pollution prevention (brochures):

THIS SECTION:

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Paints, solvents, adhesives, debris and toxic materials from home repair and remodeling are often swept, blown or washed into the Orange County storm drain system and go untreated into channels, creeks, bays and oceans. By following a few simple steps, you can prevent pollution.

Painting:

  • Use water-based paints whenever possible. Look for products labeled "latex" or "cleans with water."
  • Avoid cleaning brushes or rinsing containers in the street or gutter. For water-based paint, rinse them in the sink. For oil-based paint, clean them with thinner, which can be filtered and reused.
  • Never dump paint or paint-related products in the trash, gutter or a storm drain. Take them to a household hazardous waste collection site to be recycled.
  • Paint stripping residue, chips and dust from marine paints and paints containing lead or tributyl tin are hazardous wastes. Sweep them up and take them in a sealed container to a household hazardous waste collection site

Construction and remodeling:

  • Schedule grading and excavation projects for dry weather.
  • Practice source reduction. Order only the amount of material needed to complete the project.
  • Use recycled and recyclable materials whenever possible.
  • Keep all construction debris away from the street, gutter and storm drains.
  • Prevent erosion and sediment runoff by covering excavated material and piles of asphalt, sand and similar materials with plastic tarp.
  • Never dispose of cement washout or concrete dust into driveways, streets, gutters or storm drains.
  • Recycle broken asphalt, concrete, wood and cleared vegetation. Non-recyclables should be disposed of as a hazardous waste.

LAWNCARE AND GARDENING

Keeping lawns and gardens looking good isn't always good for our environment. Sprinkler runoff carries pesticides and fertilizers into the storm drain system. Leaves, grass clippings and yard waste get swept or blown into the street, clogging catch basins and polluting waterways. Following a few green tips is all it takes to prevent pollution.

Pesticides and fertilizers:

  • Before using, read product labels and follow the directions.
  • Use non-toxic alternatives to traditional pesticides and fertilizers.
  • Never apply pesticides or fertilizers before rain or near storm drains, channels, creeks or other water bodies.
  • Do not over apply pesticides and fertilizers. Spot apply, rather than blanketing an entire area.
  • Store pesticides, fertilizers and other chemicals in a covered area to prevent runoff.
  • Take unwanted pesticides and fertilizers to a household hazardous waste collection site to be recycled.

Wise water use:

  • Control the amount of water and direction of sprinklers, to avoid waste and runoff. The average lawn requires an inch of water each week, including rainfall, or 10-20 minutes of watering. A half-inch per week is enough for fall and spring.
  • Water your lawn early in the morning so water has time to soak into the soil before the heat of the sun causes evaporation.
  • Use drip irrigation, soaker hoses and micro spray systems, to better control the amount of water you use.
  • Periodically inspect and fix leaks and misdirected sprinklers.

Yard waste:

  • Recycle leaves, grass clippings and other yard waste, instead of blowing, sweeping or hosing them into the street or gutter.
  • Try grasscycling, letting grass clippings drop on your lawn, instead of using a grass catcher. The clippings act as a natural fertilizer, returning nutrients and organic matter back to the soil, and because grass is mostly water, it also irrigates your lawn, conserving water. Reducing the need to water as often or use toxic fertilizers means less contaminated runoff from your lawn.
  • To learn more about pest control, click here.

AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE

Taking care of our cars takes a toll on our environment. Motor oil, filters, anti-freeze, and other toxic fluids from our cars leak, spill or are dumped into the street, flowing untreated through the storm drain system to our channels, creeks, bays and oceans. Following few environmentally-friendly tips is all it takes to prevent pollution.

Changing your oil and oil filter:

  • Have your oil changed by a professional. If you do it yourself, recycle your used oil and oil filter at a certified collection center or household hazardous waste site.
  • Buy recycled motor oil for your car.
  • Clean up leaks and spills with an absorbent materials such as kitty litter.

Draining your radiator:

  • Antifreeze, made from the chemical ethylene glycol, is extremely toxic. Drain your radiator into a drip pan to avoid spills, and take the old antifreeze in a sealed container to a household hazardous waste collection site.
  • Try a less toxic alternative. Antifreeze made from propylene glycol, manufacturers claim, has a lower freezing point, a higher boiling point and lasts longer.

Washing your car:

  • Wash your vehicle at a washing facility that reclaims wash water, preventing oil, grease and toxic fluids from washing into the street and the storm drain system.
  • Use only soaps, cleaners and detergents labeled phosphate free or biodegradable. The safest products for the environment are vegetable based or citrus based soaps.
  • Select a site where the wash water can soak into grass, gravel or be diverted to nearby landscaping.

For More Information on Mobile Business:

Compliance Best Management Practices for Mobile Businesses
www.ocwatersheds.com/StormwaterProgram

PET WASTE & TIPS

pet_wasteOwning a pet can be fun and carry a lot of responsibilities, and one of those responsibilities is taking care of the community. Cypress Municipal Code states that animal waste is considered a pollutant*, and failure to pick up after your pet may result in a fine up to $500**. So next time you are walking or playing with your pet, remember to always pick up after their waste.
*Sec 13.22(a)(2)
**Sec 13.28(b)

Please follow these tips the next time you are out with your pet:

  • Take a bag. You can use grocery bags or purchase dog waste bag dispensers from your local pet store. Utilize these bags to pick up your pet’s waste
  • Throw your bag in the trash and do not leave it near the curb. These can get washed (by sprinklers, rainstorm, etc.) into the storm sewer and local water ways which makes the water unfit for drinking and swimming
  • Wash your hands after disposing

Please do not upset your neighbors and embarrass your pet. Do your part, pick up your pet’s waste, and keep the City of Cypress clean! To read more tips on how to take care of your pet and the environment, download the “Tips for Pet Care” brochure here. If you have any questions, please contact the Department of Public Works at (714) 229-6741.

Clean Water or Poop Soup? pdf

Pet_Dispenser_Locations

PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT

OVERKILL: Manage Pests and Protect Water Quality

Pesticides are one of the most dangerous pollutants found in our creeks, rivers, bays and ocean. When pesticides are sprayed on the sidewalks or in gardens, water from rain, hoses or sprinklers can carry these poisons to the storm drain where they flow, untreated, to our waterways. This can contaminate the water and threaten wildlife and marine life.

Choose the least toxic method of treatment

Pesticides should only be used when other less-toxic methods have failed. Also, use the smallest amount of pesticide needed for the job. For a list of pests and nonpesticide alternatives visit the University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Program at www.ipm.ucdavis.edu.

The best way to manage pests is to avoid them in the first place. To avoid outbreaks consider:

  • Installing and repairing screens on windows and doors.
  • Sealing cracks around windows and doors.
  • Cleaning up spills and messes.
  • Keeping trash cans tightly sealed and emptying them regularly.
  • Cleaning dirty dishes.
  • Storing all food in pest-proof containers.
  • Cleaning up grease and crumbs.
  • Repairing leaking pipes.

For fewer pests in your garden consider:

  • Draining buckets or other items that hold standing water.
  • Using mulch in flower beds to stop weeds.
  • Planting trees, shrubs and grass well-suited for the climate.
  • Only fertilizing plants with fertilizers designed to release nutrients slowly, such as compost or organic fertilizers.
  • Cutting tall weeds, brush or grass.
  • Cleaning out gutters often and making sure that water drains away from the house.

Do Your Part! Remember, the Ocean Begins At Your Front Door.

For more information about what you can do to prevent urban runoff pollution or to report a water pollution problem, contact the Orange County Stormwater Program at 714-567-6363 or visit www.ocwatersheds.com.


strmwtr_illus_businessPollution Prevention for Business

One of the most common types of pollution from businesses is contaminated water runoff, usually from cleaning and maintenance activities. Simple best management practices (BMPs) can prevent stormwater pollution, and prevention is good business. It means clean water, clean beaches and shows your customers you care about the community.

For more information on municipal, industrial and construction National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits, CLICK HERE.

THIS SECTION:

RESTAURANTS

Food waste, grease, cleaning solvents, mop water and trash from restaurant operations often make their way into the Orange County storm drain system, polluting local waterways. Follow these best management practices to prevent pollution and protect the environment.

Cleaning:

  • Clean floormats, filters and garbage cans in a mop sink, floor drain or proper outside area, not the parking lot, alley, sidewalk or street.
  • Pour washwater into a janitorial or mop sink, not outside in the parking lot, alley, sidewalk or street.
  • Use non-toxic cleaning products.

Grease & hazardous materials:

  • Recycle grease and oil, instead of pouring it into sinks, floor drains or into a parking lot or the street.
  • Dispose of all unwanted tactic materials like cleaning products through a hazardous waste hauler. These items are not trash.

Spills:

  • Use dry methods for spill cleanup, by sweeping and using cat litter instead of hosing
  • Have spill containment and cleanup kits available for possible spills on your property. To report serious toxic spills, call 911.

Outside maintenance:

  • Keep dumpster lids closed and the areas around them clean. Do not fill with liquid waste or hose them out. Call your trash hauler to replace any dumpsters that leak.
  • Sweep outside areas regularly and put the debris in the garbage, instead of sweeping or hosing it into the parking lot or the street.

For more information:

Tips for the Food Service Industry

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES
Motor oil, anti-freeze, grease and other toxic fluids from auto repair and gas station operations often make their way into the Orange County storm drain system, and flow untreated into local waterways. Follow these best management practices to prevent pollution and avoid fines and legal action.

Preventing leaks and managing spills:

  • Use drip pans to catch leaks when pouring and draining fluids.
  • Prevent leaks from stored vehicles by draining gas, hydraulic oil and transmission, brake and radiator fluids.
  • In case of a hazardous spill, follow your hazardous materials response plan as filed with your local fire department or other hazardous materials authority.
  • Be sure employees are familiar with your hazardous materials response plan and are capable of implementing it.

Storing and disposing of hazardous materials:

  • Keep liquid wastes segregated. Many fluids can be recycled through hazardous waste disposal companies, as long as they are not mixed.
  • Store hazardous materials under cover or inside, to prevent leaks and spills.
  • Recycle motor oil, oil filters, antifreeze, batteries, solvents, lubricants, tires and metal filings from grinding and polishing metal parts. These items are not trash, and are illegal to dump. Contact a hazardous waste hauler for proper disposal.

Cleaning and maintenance:

  • Use dry methods, by sweeping and using absorbent cleaning agents, to clean work areas, instead of hosing them down.
  • Sweep outside areas regularly and put the debris in the garbage, instead of sweeping or hosing it into the street.
  • Keep dumpster lids closed and the areas around them clean. Do not fill with liquid waste or hose them out. Call your trash hauler to replace any dumpsters that leak.

Washing vehicles:

  • Wash vehicles at a washing facility that reclaims water. If washed at your business, use berms or sweep to keep contaminated wash water from flowing into the street.
  • Use nontoxic detergents and cleaners.

For more information:

CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

Soil, cement wash, asphalt and oil from construction sites often make their way into the Orange County storm drain system, and flow untreated into local waterways. Follow these best management practices to prevent pollution and avoid fines and legal action.

Erosion prevention:

  • Reduce erosion by avoiding excavation or grading activities during wet weather, and by planting temporary vegetation on slopes where construction is not immediately planned.
  • Use berms and diversion dikes to channel and contain runoff.

Concrete and mortar application:

  • Prevent mortar and cement from entering storm drains by placing erosion controls such as berms or temporary vegetation down-slope to capture runoff.
  • Wash concrete mixers and equipment only in specified wash-out areas, where the water flows into containment ponds. Cement wash water can be recycled by pumping it back into cement mixers for reuse.
  • Never dispose of cement washout into driveways, streets, gutters or drainage ditches.

Handling materials and waste:

  • Cover exposed piles or bags of soil, cement and other construction materials with plastic sheeting to prevent it from blowing or washing into the storm drain system.
  • Recycle broken asphalt, concrete, wood and cleared vegetation.
  • Store hazardous materials under cover or inside, to prevent leaks and spills.
  • Dispose of hazardous materials through a hazardous waste hauler or other means in accordance with the construction permit.

Managing spills:

  • In case of a hazardous spill, follow your hazardous materials response plan as filed with your local fire department or other hazardous materials authority.

Equipment maintenance:

  • Inspect vehicles and equipment frequently for leaks.
  • Perform major equipment repairs and washing off site.
  • Use gravel approaches where truck traffic is frequent to reduce soil compaction and limit the tracking of sediment into the streets.

COMMERCIAL LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

Keeping lawns and gardens looking good isn't always good for our environment. Sprinkler runoff carries pesticides and fertilizers into the storm drain system. Leaves, grass clippings and yard waste get swept or blown into the street, along with sediment from erosion, clogging catch basins and polluting waterways. Follow these best management practices to prevent pollution and avoid fines and legal action.

Yard waste:

  • Recycle leaves, grass clippings and other yard waste, instead of blowing, sweeping or hosing them into the street or gutter.
  • Let your customers know about grasscycling. Let grass clippings drop on the lawn, instead of using a grass catcher. The clippings act as a natural fertilizer, returning nutrients and organic matter back to the soil, and because grass is mostly water, it also irrigates lawns, conserving water. Reducing the need to water as often or use toxic fertilizers means less contaminated runoff.

Erosion prevention:

  • Prevent erosion and sediment runoff by using berms and vegetation down-slope to capture runoff.
  • Cover exposed piles or bags of soil, groundcover and other materials with plastic sheeting to prevent it from blowing or washing into the storm drain system.

Pesticides and fertilizers:

  • Spot apply pesticides, rather than blanketing entire areas.
  • Ask you customers if they prefer nontoxic alternatives to traditional pesticides and fertilizers.
  • Do not put pesticides or fertilizers in the trash. Dispose of hazardous materials through a hazardous waste hauler or take them to a household hazardous waste collection site to be recycled.

Wise water use:

  • Control the amount of water and direction of sprinklers, to avoid waste and runoff.
  • Periodically inspect and fix leaks and misdirected sprinklers.

For more information, see the brochure, Responsible Pest Control, or call the County of Orange Stormwater Section at 714-955-0600 OR GO TO www.ocwatersheds.com.

INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL/MOBILE BUSINESSES
Pollutants such as metals, paints, sediments, oil, grease dirt and toxic chemicals can be flown or washed away from your business into storm drains that eventually flow to the ocean. There are various ways to prevent pollutant discharges.

The following handbook describes the different best management practices (BMPs) that businesses can use to minimize the discharge of pollutants into the storm drains.

BMPs Handbook for Industrial/Commercial/Mobile Businesses


strmwtr_illus_hhw Household Hazardous Waste & Oil Recycling

Toxic household materials like motor oil and oil filters, anti-freeze, paints, solvents, cleaners and old batteries are too hazardous to throw in the trash. Once in a landfill, they can contaminate ground water and pollute our creeks, channels, bays and th

ocean.

Take your unwanted household hazardous waste to one of Orange County's four convenient collection centers. You can also recycle used motor oil and oil filters at one of the many certified collection centers throughout the County, including most auto parts stores and gas stations.

THIS PAGE:

DISPOSAL OF HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE AND EWASTE

Orange County has one of the most extensive and efficient household hazardous waste collection programs in Southern California. With four permanent collection facilities open five days a week, including Saturdays, and offering fast drive-up and drop-off service, a quick and convenient way to safely dispose of your household hazardous waste is right around the corner. Just follow these directions.

  • A maximum of 15 gallons or 125 pounds may be transported per vehicle, per trip.
  • Materials should be in original continers, except motor oil, fuels and antifreeze.
  • Place your items in a sturdy box, preferably in their original, labeled containers. All containers should have lids, not leak and be protected from breakage.
  • Do not combine types of waste, or mix oil-based paint with latex paint.
  • If you want a container returned, like oil containers and boxes or crates used to transport materials, please notify the collection attendant in advance. Some containers may not be returnable.

Accepted Materials

  • Automotive fluids (antifreeze, motor oil)
  • Paint products
  • Batteries (home & car)
  • Personal care products
  • Cosmetics
  • Pesticides
  • Herbicides
  • Polishes and waxes
  • Hobby supplies
  • Pool and spa chemicals
  • Household cleaners
  • Propane barbecues tanks
  • Fuels
  • Unused road flares
  • Medicines
  • Wood preservatives
  • Paints (latex & oil)

Unacceptable Materials

  • Ammunition
  • Explosives
  • Asbestos
  • Radioactive materials
  • Biological materials
  • Compressed gas cylinders
  • Business-generated materials

COLLECTION LOCATIONS - http://oclandfills.com/hazardous

The following locations are open Tuesday through Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 3 p.m., except for rainy days and major holidays, including 4th of July, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day. Services are free of charge and proof of residency (Orange County residents only) is required.

For more information about Orange County's household hazardous waste collection program, and the Stop & Swap, call (714) 834-6752 or visit the Orange County landfills website at http://oclandfills.com/hazardous.

Anaheim

Stop and Swap Location
1071 N. Blue Gum Street
Between the 91 and 57 Freeways on the corner of La Palma and Blue Gum.

The Stop and Swap is a unique and free program that allows you to drop off household, yard, and car care products you no longer need and pick up others you can use.

Huntington Beach

17121 Nichols Street
Between Beach Boulevard and Gothard Street, off Warner Avenue at Rainbow Recycling and Disposal. Use Gate 6.

Irvine

Stop and Swap Location
6411 Oak Canyon
Between the 5 and 405 freeways, next to the City Corporate Yard and Animal Shelter.

San Juan Capistrano

Prima Descha Landfill
From the 55 Freeway, Exit Ortega highway, go east to La Pata and turn right.

For more informationabout Orange County's household hazardous waste collection program, and the Stop & Swap, call (714) 834-6752.

USED OIL RECYCLING

You can recycle used motor oil and oil filters at one of the many certified collection centers throughout the County, including most auto parts stores and gas stations.

Used Oil Recycling Locations in Cypress

CLICK HERE to go to the California Integrated Waste Management Board's web site, where you can get a list of used oil collection centers in any city just by entering the zip code.


strmwtr_illus_reporting Pollution Reporting

HOW TO REPORT STORMWATER POLLUTION OR STREET DRAIN PROBLEMS

Report incidents of water pollution problems, such as illegal dumping or discharges to keep our flood control channels, creeks, bays and the ocean clean.

Report street drain problems, including clogged catch basins and faded or missing storm drain stencils.

If you have any questions or concerns about your report, please call City of Cypress Public Works Department at (714) 229-6752.

For the County of Orange's 24-hour water pollution reporting hotline, call 1-877-89SPILL, or visit: http://ocwatersheds.com/wphotline/reporting.
To report chemical spill emergencies, call 911.


strmwtr_illus_kidsKids' Corner

Welcome to Kid's Corner. Where you can get the story on stormwater pollution, and learn why our creeks, bays and ocean get polluted. Discover what you and your friends can do to help prevent pollution, and how to play it safe, in your neighborhood and at the beach.

STORMWATER ABC's

Stormwater pollution happens because dirty water contaminated with stuff like trash, cigarette butts and dog poop, goes from the street into our creeks, bays and the ocean. This dirty water flows through storm drains, so it's called stormwater pollution. See if you know some of these other important stormwater words:

Catch Basins

kids_catch_basin
Catch basins are the openings in the gutter at the corner of the street. They catch water as it runs down the gutter, so they're called catch basins. Once something is swept, blown or washed into a catch basin, it goes directly to the ocean. That's why catch basins are for water only. Not trash.

Runoff

kids_runoff2
When it rains, or when people use their sprinklers on their lawn or a hose to wash their car, the water runs down the gutter and into catch basins. This runoff mixes with garbage, motor oil and other nasty stuff in the street and flows out into the ocean.

Storm Drains

kids_stormdrain
Storm drains are the concrete openings or metal pipes you can see at the beach, that have water flowing from them into the ocean. Never play in the water flowing from a storm drain, or go in the ocean directly in front of a storm drain.

Contamination

kids_contamination
When the beach is closed because it isn't safe to swim in the ocean, it happens because of contamination. Contamination means something has polluted the water and made it unhealthy for swimming and sea creatures.

Watershed

kids_watershed
It's not a building. It's a place. We all live in a watershed, a large area, even bigger than a city, where water drains through the streets, river beds and mountains down to the beach. Understanding how watersheds work helps us understand how to keep our rivers, lakes and the ocean clean.

SEVEN WAYS TO BE STORMWATER SMART

  1. Stay away from storm drains at the beach.
  2. Play away from puddles or pools of water near storm drains.
  3. Take a break from swimming or surfing for at least 3 days after it rains, when stuff from the street gets washed into the ocean.
  4. Don't pour anything into the street or a catch basin. It ends up in the ocean.
  5. Always pick up after your pet and properly dispose pet waste.
  6. Don't litter. It trashes the beach.

Orange County's water education programs:

The Municipal Water District of Orange County offers a variety of education programs available to local schools, to help kids learn more about water and water pollution.

School education:

A guest speaker can visit your classroom or school assembly. School education programs include presentations, skits and programs to help teachers incorporate water education into the classroom. For more information, please visit www.mwdoc.com/services/school-programs or contact Adam Jackson, Discovery Cube, 714-263-3806, or Gonzalo Vazquez, City of Cypress, 714-229-6752.

Poster and slogan contest:

The Water District has a poster and slogan contest every year for kids, kindergarten through 6th grade. The winning entries go in a calendar that is sent to every classroom teacher in Orange County elementary schools. For more information, please visit www.mwdoc.com/services/poster-slogan or contact Laura Loewen, 714-593-5004

Enviro-What?

The EnviroScape ® is a hands-on education and communication tool, effective for all ages, and allows participants to relate water pollution sources in their communities to the impacts on our creeks, bays and ocean. Interested in having one of the models at a public event or educational class? Call the Orange County Stormwater Program at 714-955-0672, or send an e-mail to christy.suppes@ocpw.ocgov.com.

Volunteering:

Kid power can prevent stormwater pollution. It happens every day. Kids like you, making a real difference. Visit our links or the volunteer information on the County's Watershed Division web site. From beach and park cleanups to nature walks, wildlife protection programs, water quality monitoring and more, there's always something going on in your community. Check it out.

For more information:

Please visit the OC Watersheds Kids Corner website: http://ocwatersheds.com/publiced/kidscorner

Do You Know Where Runoff Goes in Orange County?


strmwtr_illus_linksLinks

The following are outside links to related sites, where you can find additional information on stormwater pollution prevention and water quality.

LOCAL RESOURCES

24-hour non-emergency Water Pollution Hotline (recording)
(714) 955-0674, or fill out this site's online water pollution reporting form. For chemical and hazardous materials spill emergencies, call 911

O.C. Household Hazardous Waste Information http://oclandfills.com/hazardous/, or (714) 834-6752

For locations that accept used motor oil:
California Integrated Waste Management Board, www.CIWMB.ca.gov

For agriculture chemicals, pesticides and possible alternatives: O.C. Agriculture Commissioner, (714) 447-7100.

REGIONAL RESOURCES

ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCACY GROUPS


NEW CITY OF CYPRESS EMPLOYEES

The City of Cypress is required under the State of California Waste Discharge Requirements to provide training to its new employees in regards to water pollution prevention.

As a new employee to the City, you are required to participate in the “Stormwater 101” training. This training is intended to increase employee’ awareness of stormwater issues and to provide them with a general knowledge of the goals of the City’s Stormwater Program.

Please take the time to read the Employee Training Stormwater 101. The training should not take more than 5 minutes to complete. After you have finished reading Stormwater 101, please print out the self-certification statement, sign it, and return it to the Water Quality Manager in the Public Works Department. This information will be kept on file in the Public Works Department. A copy of this form will also be placed in your personnel file by Human Resources.

Please complete the training and return the signed self-certification statement within 2 days.

Remember, the ocean begins at your front door.

Thank you for completing the City of Cypress Stormwater Quality Program New Employee Orientation Training.

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